What is the difference between public speaking and storytelling?

Public speaking and storytelling are two different forms of communication, but they share some similarities. They both involve using words to convey information and ideas to an audience, but the way in which the information is presented and the purpose of the communication are different.

As Will Storr said in his book "The Science of Storytelling," "Public speaking is often focused on conveying information, while storytelling is focused on creating an emotional connection with the audience." Public speaking is typically used to present facts, figures, and information in a logical and organized manner, while storytelling is used to entertain, inspire, and connect with the audience on an emotional level.

Public speaking is often used in formal settings such as business meetings, conferences, and lectures. The speaker's goal is to convey information and persuade the audience to take a specific action or adopt a particular viewpoint. Storytelling, on the other hand, is often used in more informal settings such as storytelling festivals, dinner parties, and family gatherings. The storyteller's goal is to entertain, inspire, and connect with the audience on an emotional level.

Another key difference between public speaking and storytelling is the way in which the information is presented. Public speaking is often more structured, with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. Storytelling is more fluid and less structured, with a focus on creating an emotional connection with the audience.

In conclusion, public speaking and storytelling are two different forms of communication that share some similarities, but the way in which the information is presented and the purpose of the communication are different. Public speaking is often focused on conveying information while storytelling is focused on creating an emotional connection with the audience. As Will Storr said, "public speaking is often focused on conveying information, while storytelling is focused on creating an emotional connection with the audience." Both are important skills to have, and they can complement each other when used together.